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Treble Clef Sight Reading Exercises

Last week I put together four basic scores for the right hand (treble clef) for one of my pupils in the hope that it would increase their confidence in sight reading. And seeing as I put all of three minutes effort into these scores, I've decided to justify that time even more by making them publicly available.


All of the following scores are unnamed, however you will know if you are getting them right because they are all well known tunes!


The pieces increase in difficulty, so start here at the beginning and work up.


PS - I do not give the answers for what the pieces are. These are for you to work out!



Exercise One


piano Jack Mitchell Smith pianist macclesfield Congleton technique sight reading practice treble clef


A Helping Hand



Note that many beginners learn what is called 'C position', and if you are one of these learners then this exercise should be very straightforward to you!


C position means you lay your fingers across the notes (Middle) C, D, E, F and G with finger 1 (thumb), 2, 3, 4 and 5 respective.


Therefore, your starting note - clearly marked as being played with finger 3 - is an E!



Exercise Two


piano Jack Mitchell Smith pianist macclesfield Congleton technique sight reading practice treble clef


A Helping Hand



This piece almost uses C position in its entirety, but note that the finger 1 (the thumb) is marked for the note in the third bar. This note, which falls on the line below Middle C is, of course, a B. Take advantage of the rest at the end of the second bar to move your thumb ever so slightly lower than the rest of your hand to ensure it is in position, similarly taking advantage of the rest at the end of the fourth bar to move it back into position.



Exercise Three


piano Jack Mitchell Smith pianist macclesfield Congleton technique sight reading practice treble clef


A Helping Hand



Do you remember what the bar line after bars 4 and 6 are?


They are repeat marks. The line with the two dots on the right represents the beginning of the passage to be repeated, whereas the line with the two dots on the left represent the point at which you repeat.


Therefore, bars 5 and 6 are repeated before you continue playing to the end.



Exercise Four


piano Jack Mitchell Smith pianist macclesfield Congleton technique sight reading practice treble clef



A Helping Hand



Pay close attention to the fingers here again, especially after the rest in the fifth bar.


Remember also that the notes on the first bar occur on beats 3 and 4, so when you count, remember to count 1 - 2 before you play your notes so that your timing is together.


 

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